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Medical Biller and Coder vs Medical Transcriptionist

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Home » Blog » Biller & Coder vs. Transcriptionist
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Written and reported by:
All Allied Health Schools Staff

The healthcare industry generates mounds of paperwork, and it takes armies of trained professionals keep hospitals, doctor’s offices, and insurance companies on the same page.

Medical transcriptionists work with doctors and other healthcare providers, turning audio recordings about patient care into written notes that go into a patient’s file.

Medical coders work with those files, making sure they’re up-to-date and they comply with federal regulations and insurance requirements. Medical billers (a subset of medical coders) submit claims to insurance companies, Medicare, and others.

The Key Differences

Here’s more detail about how these careers, which both play a vital role in keeping the healthcare system running smoothly, differ:

Job Duties


Medical Biller & Coder

  • Assign alphanumeric codes to illnesses, injuries, and medical procedures
  • Submit claims for reimbursement
  • Advise providers on best documentation practices

Medical Transcriptionist

  • Listen to audio recordings made by doctors and other health care professionals and convert them into written reports
  • Edit drafts prepared by speech recognition software for accuracy and style consistency
  • Pinpoint inconsistencies or errors and follow up with medical professionals

Education


Medical Biller & Coder

Medical Transcriptionist

Licensing and Certification


Medical Biller & Coder

Medical Transcriptionist

Median Annual Salaries and Job Growth

You can compare national salaries for both professions below.

Medical Records Specialists

National data

Median Salary: $46,660

Projected job growth: 6.6%

10th Percentile: $29,430

25th Percentile: $36,930

75th Percentile: $59,120

90th Percentile: $74,200

Projected job growth: 6.6%

State data

State Median Salary Bottom 10% Top 10%
Alaska $47,820 $37,190 $76,550
Alabama $36,930 $24,800 $59,700
Arkansas $36,850 $27,950 $58,920
Arizona $38,450 $29,440 $60,240
California $51,170 $36,610 $94,310
Colorado $47,510 $36,620 $74,250
Connecticut $55,100 $37,130 $86,080
District of Columbia $60,020 $37,990 $96,870
Delaware $46,910 $29,400 $60,520
Florida $38,580 $29,050 $63,690
Georgia $37,500 $28,810 $67,690
Hawaii $48,070 $37,430 $77,830
Iowa $39,870 $30,380 $60,930
Idaho $46,480 $29,450 $60,620
Illinois $46,640 $32,910 $64,120
Indiana $46,640 $29,430 $62,640
Kansas $44,200 $29,110 $59,770
Kentucky $40,100 $29,010 $60,580
Louisiana $38,270 $28,150 $60,820
Massachusetts $59,120 $37,090 $93,720
Maryland $48,350 $35,730 $77,810
Maine $37,190 $29,430 $58,810
Michigan $38,740 $29,220 $61,160
Minnesota $50,470 $37,840 $74,200
Missouri $46,520 $29,110 $66,020
Mississippi $36,760 $22,520 $59,180
Montana $45,840 $29,650 $61,250
North Carolina $38,620 $29,140 $60,780
North Dakota $47,270 $34,840 $61,250
Nebraska $39,400 $29,440 $60,240
New Hampshire $38,180 $29,440 $60,240
New Jersey $61,680 $46,910 $96,170
New Mexico $38,670 $29,250 $60,930
Nevada $37,510 $29,270 $59,380
New York $48,350 $36,930 $77,810
Ohio $46,640 $29,440 $62,610
Oklahoma $44,180 $29,000 $60,340
Oregon $47,940 $36,930 $75,940
Pennsylvania $45,000 $29,550 $74,660
Rhode Island $47,340 $36,910 $74,250
South Carolina $41,140 $29,090 $72,470
South Dakota $46,640 $29,400 $71,120
Tennessee $38,890 $29,010 $61,400
Texas $39,140 $29,030 $63,330
Utah $46,700 $29,520 $73,740
Virginia $47,410 $30,570 $76,240
Vermont $46,660 $36,340 $59,770
Washington $48,500 $36,930 $76,950
Wisconsin $47,340 $37,070 $62,050
West Virginia $37,190 $28,920 $59,800
Wyoming $46,880 $29,550 $73,580

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) 2021 median salary; projected job growth through 2031. Actual salaries vary depending on location, level of education, years of experience, work environment, and other factors. Salaries may differ even more for those who are self-employed or work part time.

Medical Transcriptionists

National data

Median Salary: $30,100

Projected job growth: -6.5%

10th Percentile: $22,810

25th Percentile: $28,220

75th Percentile: $38,220

90th Percentile: $48,190

Projected job growth: -6.5%

State data

State Median Salary Bottom 10% Top 10%
Alaska $37,860 $30,640 $74,270
Alabama $30,860 $20,950 $45,710
Arkansas $30,100 $24,320 $38,780
Arizona $29,990 $26,830 $46,210
California $29,120 $29,120 $48,160
Colorado $36,630 $25,630 $50,980
Connecticut $48,510 $43,720 $61,060
Delaware $33,350 $22,920 $50,810
Florida $28,900 $22,350 $46,170
Georgia $23,150 $17,920 $43,620
Hawaii $46,210 $30,150 $58,850
Iowa $36,270 $22,660 $47,470
Idaho $27,890 $24,460 $38,880
Illinois $23,450 $22,880 $49,800
Indiana $30,100 $22,400 $47,780
Kansas $30,540 $23,360 $47,470
Kentucky $36,360 $22,390 $46,330
Louisiana $36,360 $23,700 $48,650
Massachusetts $37,050 $29,500 $48,510
Maryland $42,000 $24,710 $48,510
Maine $36,620 $29,990 $46,550
Michigan $28,560 $22,070 $46,210
Minnesota $47,780 $25,220 $58,850
Missouri $35,110 $28,080 $46,210
Mississippi $29,760 $22,660 $44,550
Montana $38,070 $35,280 $59,760
North Carolina $30,210 $17,740 $47,470
North Dakota $37,260 $22,350 $48,150
Nebraska $36,520 $23,920 $48,960
New Hampshire $38,220 $29,110 $48,490
New Jersey $46,330 $29,130 $58,640
New Mexico $23,680 $22,720 $39,260
Nevada $37,800 $24,110 $48,150
New York $30,640 $26,000 $46,610
Ohio $24,100 $20,600 $46,040
Oklahoma $30,380 $17,270 $58,180
Oregon $37,860 $29,130 $58,640
Pennsylvania $36,560 $24,460 $48,540
Rhode Island $36,770 $24,510 $48,160
South Carolina $30,540 $27,430 $48,300
South Dakota $37,660 $29,280 $48,310
Tennessee $26,680 $22,460 $45,460
Texas $28,780 $19,130 $45,850
Utah $38,000 $30,100 $48,150
Virginia $28,980 $22,720 $61,220
Vermont $38,220 $36,360 $47,470
Washington $44,970 $30,640 $58,850
Wisconsin $43,060 $22,920 $48,190
West Virginia $29,940 $21,490 $45,160
Wyoming $47,460 $36,520 $48,510

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) 2021 median salary; projected job growth through 2031. Actual salaries vary depending on location, level of education, years of experience, work environment, and other factors. Salaries may differ even more for those who are self-employed or work part time.

Job Growth

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the national average for all jobs is 5 percent through 2031. Here’s how medical billers and coders and transcriptionists compare.

Medical Biller & Coder

7%

Medical Transcriptionist

The BLS anticipates a negative (-7%) job growth for medical transcriptionists through 2031.

What’s Next?


  • Medical Biller & Coder: Getting certified as an advanced or specialty coder is one way to advance your career.
  • Medical Transcriptionist: Getting certified as a Registered Medical Transcriptionist (RMT) or Certified Medical Transcriptionist (CMT) can help you stand out when applying for jobs.